Meet And Greet Author Day

 

Wendy Dunn and I are the Australian author representatives of the MadeGlobal publishing family and had our own table complete with our books, bookmarks, and our Madeglobal giveaway pens. An incredibly talented author, Kathryn Gauci took this lovely photo of us. Also authoring at the event was Rachael Nightingale, Elizabeth Corbett. Barbara Denvil and many others

It was a fabulous opportunity, not only to promote and distribute our own books but to support and learn from other authors. We were looked after by the library staff from the moment we arrived and even had our own authors lounge with free tea and coffee.

The photo below was taken of me in front of a green screen and my book superimposed. Amazing. Many thanks to Wendy Dunn for sending it to me via email.

 

Best Tip of the day

A Sales point reader

Two authors had sales point readers plugged into their iphones. I was fascinated by how easy it was for a reader who wanted to buy a book but didn’t have the cash on them to simply swipe their credit card. This is something I’m definitely going to look into buying over the next couple of days.

Mill Park Library was an excellent opportunity to  meet, greet and share writing journeys with other authors. This iconic library building  at 394 Plenty Road Mill Park Victoria opened in 2002 at a cost of $8 million and was the first library in Victoria to be designed on the concept of a hybrid digital/print library.

Location Photo

The Debut Day is an opportunity for emerging local and debut authors to connect with new readers and with each other. Writing can be a lonely occupation and most authors relish chatting to others and sharing experiences. The library was set up EXPO style! Authors promoted their books, chatted with readers and amongst themselves and even sold copies on the day.

We all thoroughly enjoyed the day chatting to our readers, meeting each other and talking about our writing journeys. We all agree that the first draft is written from the heart. After that we revise, revise and revise. To all budding writers always remember…

 

The Unspoken Secret

How I’m writing my third novel.

I never choose a story. The story chooses me. During my two writing classes at Godfrey Street Community House I always have at least twenty minutes stream of consciousness writing. We call it a splurge.  The idea is to knock the critic off your shoulder and with no thoughts about grammar or punctuation you write whatever comes into your head.

Doing this form of uncensored writing with other members of our group frees me from fear and perfectionism and the aim is to grow as a writer. It may not be my best work but the idea is to write from the heart.

So what has kept bubbling to the surface of my writing mind? I find I am having great fun writing my third book. Every time I put pen to paper, or tap away on my computer I find myself writing about two aging hairdressers and one has multiple affairs. However, the main focus of this book is revealed in the working title The Unspoken Secret. What else could it be about apart from old age. As an elderly friend said, ‘When you turn eighty…God help you.’

After reaching three score years and ten it is impossible to avoid the signs. The affects of gravity are everywhere and everything about you is dragged downwards. Your skin is wrinkled, you lose an inch in height and you have to wear glasses if you want to see anything clearly. But would you have believed that one day you would be old? That it is a fact of life? No. It is the unspoken secret

The only way to cope with the stark  reality is to make fun of it and simply get on with living.

The Senility Prayer. 

Grant me the senility  to forget the people I never liked, the good fortune to run into the ones I do, and the eyesight to tell the difference.

I am having so much fun writing this book and by having time for me I am able to relate to others more fully. We recently flew to the Gold Coast to spend time with our two grandchildren. Aged ten and seven, Tahlia and Caxton lead active lives.

     

I watched them run around netball courts, soccer fields and football grounds and reveled in their athletic abilities

I clapped and cheered when the Broadbeach State School Choir won their way into the finals in August.

They are growing up so fast and one day they too will suddenly find that years have gone and it will be time for them to begin to understand the unspoken secret. I hope my book will help them to laugh at and find the funny side, plus the benefits of growing old. After all…who would complain about growing old when many people don’t have the privilege.

Guest Speaker at VIEW Luncheon

Different women, one view. How awesome is that!

I was invited as the author of Pickle to Pie and Something Missing to talk about how I became a novelist and my journey from VCE to PhD. I was to be the guest speaker at the VIEW Dingley Chelenham inaugural luncheon at the Keysborough Golf Club.

After receiving the invitation the first thing I did was to learn as much as I could, via the internet, about this amazing group of talented women. However, I was not prepared for the genuine welcome and friendliness of everyone there. Edna, Jennie and Kath, all from different VIEW clubs and part of the Development Team, plus the National president, Gwen Wilton took me under their wing. We laughed, shared stories and I learnt first hand about the many projects they embraced. Wonderful women, all with a story to tell.

I soon understood that VIEW was an acronym for voice, interests and education of women. They believe that every child deserves a chance and they live by Mother Teresa’s  belief in the joy of giving a gift when there is no chance of any return.

As Australia’s largest children’s educational charity, The Smith Family provides targeted educational support for disadvantaged students. There are 34,000 students in Australia currently supported by The Smith Family Group

As an APA (Australian Postgraduate Award) scholarship recipient for my PhD at Swinburne University I know only too well what a scholarship can mean to a student. I makes you feel as if some group has faith in you as a person, not only to deliver a 100,000 word thesis but also that your work will add to the sum of human knowledge. Someone cares enough to back you financially for three years. You are not alone. Someone is supporting you and your passion. For a mature aged woman student  it makes you stand tall and in my male orientated  world, money speaks louder than words.

VIEW’s pledge is to promote the interest of VIEW, extend friendship to all and to help those in need. One student William Nguyen was identified as needing assistance and with VIEW support is currently studying at Monash University. His story of growing up in a single parent home with three younger brothers in Sunshine and the importance of being supported and helped over the years was inspiring. He was such a humble, intelligent young man. I can see him going far in his chosen career.

The focus of this amazing group is to improve the educational outcomes of disadvantaged children. In this way they make a positive, sustainable and measurable difference. And they do it so well. The whole event was beautifully organised, speakers stuck to allotted times and the venue looked fantastic. But more important than that was the happy atmosphere in the room. They laughed, swapped stories and made the most of every minute. It was a joyous occasion.

This day was a celebration. The newly formed Dingley – Chelsea had the twenty-five members needed to form their own VIEW group and were being inducted into the VIEW family. There was even an amazing colour co-ordinated cake

Each new member was called forward to the podium, received their VIEW badge, shook hands with the National president of VIEW and smiled for the camera. The group photo  will surely find its way into the monthly magazine viewmatters.

After a delicious meal it was time for me to talk about how I never thought about becoming a writer until a twist of fate uncovered a passion that changed my studies at University from Sociology to Creative Writing. I shared with them my delight when my PhD novel, Something Missing was published by the London based MadeGlobal Publishing. From there I talked about the joys and pitfalls of returning to study as a mature aged student and the impact of being awarded an APA doctorate scholarship. How it meant I could complete my academic journey.

 I could also promote my books and pass on where to buy a copy of Something Missing

 

In December Something Missing, was published by Madeglobal Publishing.com and is available from www.madeglobal.com or www.glenicewhitting.com

Book depository (free postage): https://www.bookdepository.com/Something-Missing-Glenice-Whitting/9788494593765

Amazon.com: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Something+missing+glenice+whitting

Amazon Kindle books: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MQKMUZZ?tag=theancom-20

Something Missing

Two women, two countries. Serendipity, life, friendship

Diane, a young Australian mother meets Maggie, a sophisticated American poet, in a chance encounter. Everything – age, class and even nationality – separates them. Yet all is not quite as it seems. Maggie is grieving for her eldest daughter and trapped in a marriage involving infidelity and rape. Diane yearns for the same opportunities given to her brother. Their lives draw them to connect. This is the story of two unfulfilled women finding each other when they needed it most. Their pen-friendship will change them forever.

 

And The Winner is…

Unfortunately, there can only be one winner of the competition for a copy of my novel Something Missing 

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One name was randomly selected from the list of email addresses of subscribers at www.glenicewhitting.com. I was delighted to see Gillian Polack‘s name emerge. Soon a copy of the book will be winging its way to her.

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Congratulations, Gillian.

May you have hours of happy reading

I would like to thank everyone who subscribed at my website and entered this competition

I’m sure you will have better luck next time.

Your participation is greatly appreciated.

bunch

Only Two Days To Go

In two days the winner of a copy of the novel , Something Missing will be chosen from the subscribers to www.glenicewhitting,com.

If you haven’t subscribed already why not take this opportunity to get your name on the list and a copy of the book could be winging it’s way to you.

The Perfect Australian Mother’s Day Gift.

A book that deals with two women and their life-long pen-friendship will be the perfect gift for Mother’s Day on the Sunday 14th May. This book and a bunch of gorgeous flowers would brighten any mother’s heart.

      Country Garden

Unfortunately for this competition Mother’s Day in  the UK was on the 30th of March 2017.

I guess. if you are in the UK  you could always keep your hard won copy for a more opportune time, maybe even 2018. I don’t know why, but the years seem to fly past at an ever increasing pace. Good heaven, soon half this year will be gone and we’ll be thinking once again of celebrating Christmas.

I’ll be drawing drawing the winner of the competition on the 2nd of May instead of the last day in  April because many subscribers are from England.  I must be fair to them . I will never get used to the fact that when it is Tuesday morning here it is Monday evening in London. You should see the times we have our MadeGlobal Publishing masterclasses. It’s usually aproximately 10pm Saturday night for English Authors while the Australian authors get 9am Sunday morning , And then there are authors from USA, Ireland, Belarus to name a few.

Best wishes to all who have taken the time and trouble to participate in this competition.

GOOD LUCK

Meeting Other Writers And Sharing Ideas

It is so important not to lock yourself away in an attic to produce your latest work. Writers need to be with other writers, to share ideas, successes and discuss problems.

Last Sunday I caught a bus to the station and spent an hour reading as the train rattled its way to the city. Melbourne was buzzing. Buskers performed, played unusual instruments and generally entertained. The street market was in full swing. A French style black felt hat caught my eye but at $120 was soon replaced on its stand. The Yarra river was bustling with boats ferrying happy passengers and the coffee shops were full.

At the Vic Restaurant at the Art Centre under the spire I met a group of Hysterical Melbourne Historical writers.

It was so uplifting to sit and talk about our latest projects and discuss the highs and lows of the writing life. I know Pickle to Pie fits nicely into Historical Fiction but I’m afraid Something Missing and this latest book are a little too modern.  But it doesn’t matter. What matters is to be communicating with like minded people. It refreshed my soul and inspired me to jot down hasty notes in the train going home and pound the keyboard of my trusty computer late into the night.

 

Thank You, Dr. Charles French

This is my first reblog but I join many others in thanking Dr Charles French and Jennie for all their help and support over the years

A Teacher's Reflections

I posted on my blog yesterday, “A Gift of Charlotte’s Web.”  As I scrolled down to print a hard copy (yes, I have a hard copy of every blog post- it’s wonderful), I looked at the three suggested readings of similar posts.  One was titled, “Death and Dying and Chapter Reading.”  What? I could not remember the post, as it was quite old.  Well, I read it again, and it was terrific.

Then, I looked at the bottom of the post.  There was only one ‘like’.  One!  That ‘like’ was Charles French.  He has been a follower and supporter of my blog since way-back-when.

I learned everything I needed and wanted to know by following his blog.  I learned how to thank people, how to follow people, and how to reblog.  I learned, and Charles French kept reading and liking my blog posts.  His blog has become a favorite and a gold…

View original post 773 more words

Subscribers Button Fixed at www.glenicewhitting.com

Fantastic news. Webcare have fixed my subscribers button
Apparently it was a bigpond email problem…again

Please try to subscribe again at http://www.glenicewhitting.com for a chance to win a free copy of ‘Something Missing’ .

friendship 3

 

At the end of this month on the 27th of April I will randomly select a winner from my http://www.glenicewhitting.com webpage subscribers list and announce it here and on Facebook and twitter

GOOD LUCK 

Moving to https://www.glenicewhitting.com

I have been told that my blog should now be at my new wordpress website so I am moving to www.glenicewhitting.com

I invite anyone who has enjoyed my rambling blog about my life/writing/ publishing/marketing and experiences with MadeGlobal Publishing to join me at  www.glenicewhitting.com. 

For all future blogs just click on the link www.glenicewhitting.com. and whatever you do, please SUBSCRIBE.

IT COSTS NOTHING and you will be notified once a week when I post a blog. If you don’t want to see what marketing a book is all about at least you will get one of my quick and easy recipes to keep you going when you are up to your ears tapping away in front of the computer,  jotting down your memories in an exercise book or madly marketing your latest novel and writing the next.

Here is my favourite recipe to keep body and soul together. You can even make this dish when unexpected guests arrive right on lunch time and it will still look as if it took hours to prepare. It is filling and nourishing.

Quick and Easy  Salmon or Tuna  Quiche

One 500gm  block of cheese

3 tabs flour

1 tab dried onions

1 tin Salmon or Tuna

6 eggs

Half a cup of milk

Ingredients

Method

In a bowl grate the block of cheddar cheese, add 3 tabs flour and 1 tab dried onion and mix together.

In a greased flan/pie dish place half the cheese mixture, spread over a drained tin of salmon, top with the rest of the cheese mixture

Mix six eggs with the milk and gently pour over the cheese/salmon mixture

Top with extra cheese squares and sprinkle with sweet paprika

Microwave for 10 mins, then bake for 30 mins in moderate oven

 

Serve with tossed salad and crusty bread. I find it is not only tasty but satisfying. Have fun and I hope I see you at www.glenicewhitting.com

 

                  

I’ll look forward to catching up with my friends at my new wordpress website www.glenicewhitting.com. 

 

Celebrating Women Writing History

An excellent Saturday afternoon at the Eltham Library talking with other authors about why we write history.

Catherine Padmore (on the left) from La Trobe University was excellent as chairperson for our panel discussion

Most of the authors attending write amazing books about Tudor Queens or fascinating people who have led interesting lives. I have eventually accepted that I write to unravel my recent history;  to delve into my past. To look back at the world of my parents leads to understanding them as people, their culture and their lives. By doing this often I come to terms with my past and finally understand many of the decisions I have made along this fascinating life journey.


Program: organised by

Wendy J Dunn, author of Falling Pomegrantate Seeds along with several helpers

Women’s History Month at Eltham Library
Panther Place, Eltham, Victoria Australia 3095

Generously supported by Eltham Library, Swinburne University and Madeglobal.

Eltham Library celebrates Women Writers of History by giving readers of history the opportunity to meet local (writers living in or near Melbourne) women writers of history in a series of readings and panels.

Sunday, March 5th
1.15 to 2.45
Panel discussion:
Why women write history.

Authors taking part:
Kelly Gardiner
Barbara Gaskell Denvil
Elizabeth Jane Corbett
Kate Mildenhall
Glenice Whitting
Kathryn Gauci

Chaired by Catherine Padmore.

2.45 – 3.15 Afternoon tea

3.15 – 4.45
Historical Fiction readings and book discussions.
Kathryn Gauci, Barbara Denvill and Wendy J. Dunn

Bookings taken by the Eltham Library, Phone: (03) 9439 9266, or book your ticket here: https://www.trybooking.com/256904

Saturday, March 11th

Starting at 12.30pm with readings from and discussion about their works:

Katie Holmes, Janis Sheldrick, Christina Twomey, Liz Conor

Afternoon tea

Starting at 2.30 pm.

Panel –
Liz Conor, Katie Holmes, Christina Twomey
What draws you to write about the past?
Chaired by Wendy J. Dunn
Bookings taken by the Eltham Library, Phone: (03) 9439 9266, or book your ticket here: https://www.trybooking.com/256928

March 18th
Meet the author day.

Elise McCune
Wendy J. Dunn

Afternoon tea

Rachel Rossignol
Elizabeth Jane Corbett

Bookings taken by the Eltham Library, Phone: (03) 9439 9266, or book your ticket here: https://www.trybooking.com/256912

March 25th

The powerful and different ways that non fiction and fiction tell the stories of the past, and why women are so good at telling these kinds of stories.

Professor Josie Arnold
Barbara Gaskell Denvil
Kelly Gardiner
Glenice Whitting
Chaired by Eloise Faichney

Closing celebration – wine and light refreshments provided.

History panel 5th march: Some possible discussion points to get us started on the topic of why women write history:

In preparation for this event I asked for a list of possible questions. When they arrived I quickly answered them in a stream of conciousness way by simply jotting down whatever popped into my head. Why don’t you try it. I found it an amazing, clarifying  writing exercise.

What was your catalyst for writing about the past?

The past deals with my own life and writing about it is a great way to sort stuff out. To see what really happened and why. My writing records the recent past. Pickle to Pie is about a boy, a greathearted German Grossmutter and a man caught between two worlds. It was my way of dealing with my fathers death and growing up in Parkdale to a parent of German descent. Something Missing deals with the next stage of my life. In 1975 I met my older American poet penfriend and reveal how that friendship changed our lives.

Do you prefer your protagonists to be actual or fictional figures?

I like my main characters to be based on fact and veiled in fiction. For authorial freedom I always turn the story into fiction.

Some writers choose well-known historical figures while others inhabit lesser-known ones – what choices have you made and why?

My choice is to write about everyday, non famous people. I believe their stories need to be recorded and their voices heard.

What was the most challenging aspect of your rendering of the past?

The most challenging aspect was the amount of research involved to make sure dates of major events were correct and to attend to every small detail. The grossmutter makes herbal tea and then reads what kind of leaves. Definitely not chamomile because that is made from flowers. Spearmint

What ethical dilemmas kept you up at night?

Worrying about how other people would react to my novel. Had I portrayed the motives of my characters correctly? If , heaven forbid, someone thought they recognised themselves would they be upset?

What is your sense of the relationship between the characters’ past and our present?

We learn by understanding the past. By understanding the past we can come to terms with our present.

 How do you approach ideas of authenticity in historical fiction?

Research and more research from reliable sources. It is an essential part of writing historical fiction

 What lessons have you learnt through writing the past?

By writing about my past I can now see it clearly and put to rest many things which worried me in the past. I have come to terms with my hidden German heritage and understand why my father was so withdrawn and self protective. I also now understand why I was so self driven to achieve academically and how, and why I became an author instead of a social worker

 How has writing as an Australian affected your approach to these people and events?

I try not to let nationality influence the way I think and feel about people in the past. However, it is only natural that my Australian culture and values influence the way I write. Therefore I seek help and advice from people of the nationality I’m exploring. For Pickle to Pie German born Herbert Etienne translated old postcards and helped me with my research. For Something Missing, I sent the manuscript to American author and editor Cindy Vallar and followed her advice.

How does your gender influence your approach (to history, to fiction)?

Being a woman living in a patriarchal society definitely influences my approach to fiction and to writing history. I find the cultural expectations and the roles women play affects their lives and those around them. To write about cultural values and inconsistencies means my stories often strike a cultural chord with other women. I am telling their stories as well as my own.

My First Video

Becoming a writer stretches you. You find yourself trying different things, making a video is one of them. Below is my first video made with the help of Wendy and David Dunn. Such supportive and kind people willing to extend themselves to help another in need.