Category Archives: goals

Guest Speaker at VIEW Luncheon

Different women, one view. How awesome is that!

I was invited as the author of Pickle to Pie and Something Missing to talk about how I became a novelist and my journey from VCE to PhD. I was to be the guest speaker at the VIEW Dingley Chelenham inaugural luncheon at the Keysborough Golf Club.

After receiving the invitation the first thing I did was to learn as much as I could, via the internet, about this amazing group of talented women. However, I was not prepared for the genuine welcome and friendliness of everyone there. Edna, Jennie and Kath, all from different VIEW clubs and part of the Development Team, plus the National president, Gwen Wilton took me under their wing. We laughed, shared stories and I learnt first hand about the many projects they embraced. Wonderful women, all with a story to tell.

I soon understood that VIEW was an acronym for voice, interests and education of women. They believe that every child deserves a chance and they live by Mother Teresa’s  belief in the joy of giving a gift when there is no chance of any return.

As Australia’s largest children’s educational charity, The Smith Family provides targeted educational support for disadvantaged students. There are 34,000 students in Australia currently supported by The Smith Family Group

As an APA (Australian Postgraduate Award) scholarship recipient for my PhD at Swinburne University I know only too well what a scholarship can mean to a student. I makes you feel as if some group has faith in you as a person, not only to deliver a 100,000 word thesis but also that your work will add to the sum of human knowledge. Someone cares enough to back you financially for three years. You are not alone. Someone is supporting you and your passion. For a mature aged woman student  it makes you stand tall and in my male orientated  world, money speaks louder than words.

VIEW’s pledge is to promote the interest of VIEW, extend friendship to all and to help those in need. One student William Nguyen was identified as needing assistance and with VIEW support is currently studying at Monash University. His story of growing up in a single parent home with three younger brothers in Sunshine and the importance of being supported and helped over the years was inspiring. He was such a humble, intelligent young man. I can see him going far in his chosen career.

The focus of this amazing group is to improve the educational outcomes of disadvantaged children. In this way they make a positive, sustainable and measurable difference. And they do it so well. The whole event was beautifully organised, speakers stuck to allotted times and the venue looked fantastic. But more important than that was the happy atmosphere in the room. They laughed, swapped stories and made the most of every minute. It was a joyous occasion.

This day was a celebration. The newly formed Dingley – Chelsea had the twenty-five members needed to form their own VIEW group and were being inducted into the VIEW family. There was even an amazing colour co-ordinated cake

Each new member was called forward to the podium, received their VIEW badge, shook hands with the National president of VIEW and smiled for the camera. The group photo  will surely find its way into the monthly magazine viewmatters.

After a delicious meal it was time for me to talk about how I never thought about becoming a writer until a twist of fate uncovered a passion that changed my studies at University from Sociology to Creative Writing. I shared with them my delight when my PhD novel, Something Missing was published by the London based MadeGlobal Publishing. From there I talked about the joys and pitfalls of returning to study as a mature aged student and the impact of being awarded an APA doctorate scholarship. How it meant I could complete my academic journey.

 I could also promote my books and pass on where to buy a copy of Something Missing

 

In December Something Missing, was published by Madeglobal Publishing.com and is available from www.madeglobal.com or www.glenicewhitting.com

Book depository (free postage): https://www.bookdepository.com/Something-Missing-Glenice-Whitting/9788494593765

Amazon.com: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Something+missing+glenice+whitting

Amazon Kindle books: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MQKMUZZ?tag=theancom-20

Something Missing

Two women, two countries. Serendipity, life, friendship

Diane, a young Australian mother meets Maggie, a sophisticated American poet, in a chance encounter. Everything – age, class and even nationality – separates them. Yet all is not quite as it seems. Maggie is grieving for her eldest daughter and trapped in a marriage involving infidelity and rape. Diane yearns for the same opportunities given to her brother. Their lives draw them to connect. This is the story of two unfulfilled women finding each other when they needed it most. Their pen-friendship will change them forever.

 

Thank You, Dr. Charles French

This is my first reblog but I join many others in thanking Dr Charles French and Jennie for all their help and support over the years

A Teacher's Reflections

I posted on my blog yesterday, “A Gift of Charlotte’s Web.”  As I scrolled down to print a hard copy (yes, I have a hard copy of every blog post- it’s wonderful), I looked at the three suggested readings of similar posts.  One was titled, “Death and Dying and Chapter Reading.”  What? I could not remember the post, as it was quite old.  Well, I read it again, and it was terrific.

Then, I looked at the bottom of the post.  There was only one ‘like’.  One!  That ‘like’ was Charles French.  He has been a follower and supporter of my blog since way-back-when.

I learned everything I needed and wanted to know by following his blog.  I learned how to thank people, how to follow people, and how to reblog.  I learned, and Charles French kept reading and liking my blog posts.  His blog has become a favorite and a gold…

View original post 773 more words

Subscribers Button Fixed at www.glenicewhitting.com

Fantastic news. Webcare have fixed my subscribers button
Apparently it was a bigpond email problem…again

Please try to subscribe again at http://www.glenicewhitting.com for a chance to win a free copy of ‘Something Missing’ .

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At the end of this month on the 27th of April I will randomly select a winner from my http://www.glenicewhitting.com webpage subscribers list and announce it here and on Facebook and twitter

GOOD LUCK 

‘Something Missing’ Book Launch

Friends, family and colleagues helped celebrate the launch of my latest novel Something Missing.

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Over fifty friends, family and colleagues helped me celebrate the launch of my latest novel. To simply hold my book in my hands knowing that I’d had the opportunity to thank many people involved with its evolution via the acknowledgement page was so uplifting. I felt as if I had wings. Many thanks to everyone who helped to make it such a memorable day. The book is available postage free at Bookdepository.com and is also available at Amazon.com or at my website www.glenicewhitting.com and at www.madeglobal.com

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Swinburne University kept bringing a plentiful supply of delicious food and excellent wine/champagne to the Sky Lounge at Swinburne Campus.

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My ex PhD supervisor, Associate Professor Dominique Hecq read from the novel and launched the book and I had my five minutes of fame
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Wendy Dunn made this day possible and gave an insightful introduction,
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Paul Whitting was official photographer,
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Carol-Anne Croker sold many books
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I was free to catch up with so many folk I hadn’t seen for a long time. Ingrid Ahmer flew in from Adelaide, others came from many regional areas and 95yr old Margaret Scott insisted on being there.  It was a fun filled, happy celebration.
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My email inbox was flooded with congratulatory messages. Thank you all for your good wishes and support. You are amazing
The highlight of the afternoon was when Wendy Dunn presented me with a fantastic book-shaped cake with the front cover of Something Missing proudly displayed on top. I couldn’t bear to cut it.
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Best wishes to everyone at MadeGlobal. The level of support has been greatly appreciated. It is a day I will always remember.
Have a very happy Christmas. I know I will.

Radio Interview with Neil Wanstall

I’m so excited. Something Missing is on Amazon Kindle and my new website  glenicewhitting.com has been successfully made live today.

How wonderful to see a book you have published available on the internet, but how do you market and promote your latest novel? By doing everything you can to get the word out there. Let people know how thrilled you are to see this book find it’s legs, hopefully to run.

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 This week I found myself in the studio of 3WBC 94.1 fm at 4pm being interviewed by Neil Wanstall on his radio program Roundabout.

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I had to choose four songs to play to break up our chatter. My choices were:     The Impossible Dream (from Don Quixote)

Don Quixote: The Ingenious Gentleman of La Mancha (2015)

The Rose by Bette Midler, Wild Horses and The Wind Beneath My wings because it reminded me of so many people who have supported and helped me along the way. All my writing projects have been a team effort. I have a long list of people who have inspired me over many years. How wonderful to at last have the opportunity to thank them via the acknowledgement pages of my book. You are right up front there Wendy, Mairi , Maureen, Carol-Anne,  Lisa, Julie and  Elizabeth…Wonderful women who                                                               nurture others.

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okay, so I am not used to taking selfie’s, but there was no-one around to take our photo. I’ll get the hang of it…one day. I may even remember to smile (scary thought)

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This is Neil’s attempt. What is the verdict. Better?

I found the whole experience exciting and time flew. Before I knew it Neil was  signing off and gradually, as I came back down to earth our conversation was a blur. What had we said? Hopefully it was all positive. However, my family say I’m the proverbial Pollyanna: eternally the optimist. But I also know that to get your book accepted by an international publisher like MadeGlobal all the planets need to align. And to market the book takes this thought to another level.

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Many thanks to Carol-Anne Croker for introducing me and organising my appointment. My thanks also go to Neil Wanstall, for placing me at ease, and kindly guiding me through this fascinating experience.

Rebecca Jane: Public Relations

Last Friday I met Rebecca Jane in a coffee shop in Lilydale Vic Australia.

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We are going to work with MadeGlobal Publishing to plan how we are going to market my latest novel, ‘Something Missing’.

Rebecca is studying at Swinburne University for her Bachelor of Arts, majoring in Creative Writing and Literature. Her minor is in Film and Television. At the moment, we are simply discussing how best to market my latest book.

The book launch is only 10 weeks away and there is so much to do.

Wendy Dunn and Swinburne University have kindly arranged to launch my latest novel, ‘Something Missing’ at 3pm Sunday 11th December at Swinburne University at Hawthorn. . We still have to decide on the final book cover but Mary Jane Neil designed this one for me and I’ve passed it on to the publisher. I feel it captures a story about two countries,two women, a life altering pen-friendship and the lies they tell each other.

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This is a free event, but to ascertain numbers for catering please obtain your ticket for the launch via this link:  https://www.trybooking.com/230231

It is so good to see the book launch actually in print. It makes me feel it may all actually happen. How wonderful it will be to hold this book in my hands and know that it will be in hard copy as well as on Amazon.com as a kindle book.

Check out Rebecca’s interesting interview at Wendy Dunn’s website 

Live Streaming to a London Publisher’s Event

‘Meet the Authors’ event in London with MadeGlobal publishing.

Last Sunday I attended, via live streaming on my computer, MadeGlobal’s ‘Meet the Authors’ event. There was only one hitch…8 pm Saturday evening London time was 5 am Sunday morning in Australia. I know it’s supposed to be spring in Melbourne but I had to put on my ski socks to keep my feet warm. And I’d been to a fabulous family and friends party the night before and was definitely feeling jet-lagged.

When the alarm went off at 4 am, I jumped out of bed, grabbed a cup of coffee and turned on the computer not knowing how it was all going to work out. Before I could begin attempting to log onto the website the phone rang. I thought I was the only crazy person up at that ungodly hour. It was pre-dawn black outside my window. My eldest son explained that he’d overheard me talking at the party the night before and thought I might need a hand. Bless him. After I happily invited him to Team View, he took over my computer and after logging me in had me successfully live streaming to London.

I felt as if I was in the room and was delighted to put faces to names I had only seen at the MadeGlobal website.

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This event saw nineteen of MadeGlobal Publishing’s authors come together in London for an evening which included book launches, book signings, panel discussions on historical topics, live Tudor music and a chance to talk to MadeGlobal’s CEO Tim Ridgway, Claire Ridgway and Melaine V Taylor.

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Hundreds of history fans, authors and fans of their published books joined the event. However,  authors from such distance countries such as Australia (Wendy, Dunn etc) and America and those that couldn’t make it from Ireland and England could still be part of it all via the private online streaming.

Nothing ever goes smoothly and this event was no exception. Just before the final panel discussion featuring Claire Ridgway, the live streaming stopped (we can now view that section of the night via a video). However, this event was definitely worth the 4 am leap out of my cosy bed. I enjoyed every minute.

A Writers’ Journey To Publication

Dreams do come true

I’m so excited. The manuscript of my novel, ‘Something Missing’ has been accepted for publication by MadeGlobal Publishing and I’m over the moon. I feel like a child on Christmas morning unwrapping something I’ve wanted for ages.  Imagine the pleasure in reading these words from Tim Ridgway,  ‘I’m attaching the contract. Can you sign and send back to…?’ Fantastic.

It all came about because my dear friend, Wendy Dunn, author of Falling Pomegranate Seeds published by MadeGlobal suggested I send the  manuscript I’ve been working on for ages to them  just in case it was what they were looking for.  Apparently all the planets aligned  and here I am on this exciting journey.

Mary Jane Neil did an amazing job designing a cover for me when it isn’t even her field of expertise. She used several old envelopes with American stamps etc. I’ve sent it to MadeGlobal for their consideration, plus they asked for a couple of extra photos.

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This story, about two women, a life-altering pen-friendship and the lies they tell, has been through many reincarnations before it was finally accepted by Tim Ridgway and Melanie V Taylor at MadeGlobal . This is a predominately a Tudor England site but they will soon be branching out into popular fiction. Tonight, in London, they have an inaugural, Meet the Authors night and for those of us who can’t go they have arranged for us to join in via live streaming. Below is their invitation to join them.

Meet MadeGlobal and Authors in London – online or in person
24 September event
(5am Sunday 25th Sept if you are live streaming  in Australia)

19 of our authors will be in London on Saturday 24 September, and you can meet them in person. You’ll need a ticket, so book soon!

Can’t get to London?
Don’t worry, you can join us online through a ticketed private streaming event where you can ask questions, and you’ll enjoy the whole event from the comfort of your own home (or wherever you are in the world!)

8pm tonight, London time will be 5am here in Australia Sunday morning. Even though I’m never at my best at 5am and it’s the first time I’ve live streamed, I’ll hopefully be joining them. Fingers crossed I’m not too bleary eyed and please wish me luck that all goes to plan.

 

 

 

Wendy Dunn, Author and Friend: Falling Pomegranate Seeds

I have known Wendy Dunn for many years. Recently we both completed our doctorate at Swinburne University. Believe me, those study bonds run deep.

Women collaborate and support each other. There is no competition, no one-up-man-ship, just genuine friendship.

Wendy on the radio

As soon as Wendy’s name is mentioned images flash through my mind of being in a warm loft of an old stone winery on a cold Melbourne winters day. Wind whistled through cracks but we were cozy. Best of all,  Wendy had arranged and found funding for this amazing venue for a workshop with author, Christine Balint. All this small group of writers had to do was sip mellow red wine and write, write, write. The result was an anthology titled Journeys.

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She is my close friend  and a  talented author who is always honing her craft

This third Tudor book published by MadeGlobal Publishing is no exception. It is engaging, entertaining as well as being informative. Through her books, I have learnt how people of Tudor England lived, loved and survived. In an exciting and new way they opened a previously closed window on a section of English history I knew nothing about.

Falling Pomegranate Seeds: The Duty of Daughters (The Katherine of Aragon Story Book 1) by [Dunn, Wendy J.]

About Wendy

Wendy J. Dunn is an Australian writer who has been obsessed by Anne Boleyn and Tudor History since she was ten-years-old. She is the author of two Tudor novels: Dear Heart, How Like You This?, the winner of the 2003 Glyph Fiction Award and 2004 runner up in the Eric Hoffer Award for Commercial Fiction, and The Light in the Labyrinth, is her first young adult novel.

While she continues to have a very close and spooky relationship with Sir Thomas Wyatt, the elder, serendipity of life now leaves her no longer wondering if she has been channeling Anne Boleyn and Sir Tom for years in her writing, but considering the possibility of ancestral memory. Her own family tree reveals the intriguing fact that her ancestors – possibly over three generations – had purchased land from both the Boleyn and Wyatt families to build up their own holdings. It seems very likely Wendy’s ancestors knew the Wyatts and Boleyns personally.

Born in Melbourne, Australia, Wendy is married and the mother of three sons and one daughter–named after a certain Tudor queen, surprisingly, not Anne.

Gaining her Doctorate of Philosophy (Writing) from Swinburne University in 2014, Wendy tutors at Swinburne University in their Master of Arts (Writing) program.

For more information about Wendy J. Dunn, visit her website at www.wendyjdunn.com

Wendy J. Dunn

 

An announcement from MadeGlobal website

Wendy Dunn – Hot new release
Posted by Tim Ridgway on August 25th, 2016 at 9:33 am
Falling Pomegranate Seeds: Wendy J. Dunn
Hot New Release

Wendy J. Dunn’s book “Falling Pomegranate Seeds” was launched on 20 August, and it’s already listed as number 3 in Amazon’s coveted “Hot New Releases in Tudor Historical Romance” category, just behind Philippa Gregory’s new book “Three Sisters Three Queens”. Well done Wendy!

If you’ve missed all the hype and news about this book, then it’s time to catch up – people are loving the way Wendy has told the story of Katherine of Aragon in her early life… this book is the first installment in a series and takes us up to Katherine preparing to leave Spain for England.

GET THE BOOK HERE at Amazon.com

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All writers, whether published or not, need support, encouragement and inspiration. This connective network may be found in a writing group or being amongst like-minded friends who you know will support and care for you through thick and thin. I am so fortunate to have the MadeGlobal team, especially Tim Ridgway and Melaine V Taylor, a totally supportive family and great writing buddies who watch my back and point me in the right direction. Bless you all.

What Happened at Coranderrk Aboriginal Reserve, Victoria Australia

May we never forget what happened at Coranderrk Reserve. 

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Winter in Victoria. Every Saturday at 5am, I still dream I will throw snow chains in the back of my car, grab my skis and head for Healsville and the the cross country skiing at Lake Mountain. I love driving through the tall mountain ash forest near wild dog creek, over the black spur into a pristine world of white. The air crisp and clear, the only sound the swish of my skis and the gentle plop of snow falling from trees.

On the way home I deliberately divert down piccaninny lane (piccaninny means an Australian indigenous child) and slowly climb to a fenced area surrounded by tall trees. Opening the gate I quietly stand by Barak’s grave and gaze over rolling green hills towards where Coranderrk once was a thriving community. In the past, Coranderrk was a government reserve for Australian Aborigines in the state of Victoria between 1863 and 1924, located 50km north-east of Melbourne..

S0mething in the sound of the wind in the grass and the gently sighing of trees keeps drawing me back time and time again to this place. There is a sense of longing I can’t explain. I always knew some facts but I didn’t fully understand what had happened here, so when I had the opportunity to see the play Coranderrk: We Will Show The Country based on actual transcripts from the  records of the 1881 Government Inquiry into self determination, I could not resist.

King William

William Barak (1824-1903), Aboriginal spokesman, variously called ‘King William, last chief of the Yarra Yarra tribe’ or ‘Beruk (white grub in gum tree) belonging to the Wurundjeri Willum horde whose country lay along the Yarra and Plenty Rivers’. This is from his official biography

William Barak, by Florence Fuller, 1885

With his Gippsland-born first wife Lizzie, he was among the first group of Goulburn Aboriginals who settled at Acheron in 1859, hoping to have the area reserved. After much official indecision Coranderrk, near Healesville, was gazetted and he settled there permanently in 1863, in a ‘neat little cottage and garden, most tidy and comfortable’. Barak worked for a small wage on the station farm and acquired a few horses. Further schooling and religious instruction were undertaken; he could read but not write. He was baptized, confirmed, and took a second wife Annie ‘of the Lower Murray’ (Lizzie died before 1863) in a publicized Presbyterian ceremony in 1865. The fate of his family was typical of the time; two infants died of gastro-enteritis, David and Annie of consumption. When he married Sarah (Kurnai) on 7 June 1890 he was the oldest man at Coranderrk and only full-blood survivor of his tribe.

Following the reservation of the land, Barak and the Kulin together with the first managers, John and Mary Green, enthusiastically embarked upon the task of making Coranderrk their new home. Their vision was to make the station fully self-supporting.

However,soon vested local interests began to agitate to move Barak and his people off this land, and so began a sustained, sophisticated campaign for justice, land rights and self-determination.  In collaboration with white supporters, the Kulin people used the legal and political system to force a Parliamentary Inquiry.

In the late 1870s when management of Aboriginal affairs came under vigorous public criticism Barak emerged as a respected spokesman. Until his death he was the acknowledged leader at Coranderrk and a liaison between officialdom and the native population.

His petitions and public appearances were important spurs to action, especially the government inquiry of 1881. Barak outlined a plan for autonomous communities under Coranderrk’s first manager, John Green:

‘give us this ground and let us manage here ourselves … and no one over us … we will show the country we can work it and make it pay and I know it will’.

Lisa Hill’s excellent review of the play and the book Coranderrk: We Will Show The Country from La Mama Courthouse Theatre Carlton Victoria Australia can be found at ANZlitlovers blog

Coranderrk

Lisa says the play is unique because it’s based entirely on transcripts from the 19th century paper trail of an heroic struggle for Aboriginal self-determination.  Having been dispossessed of their ancestral lands by European settlement, a small band of survivors from the Kulin Nation petitioned the colonial government for a land grant to set up the Coranderrk Reserve.  There they created an award-winning farm and an impressive settlement.

The outcome of the Inquiry?

In the short term the inquiry marked a clear victory for the Corranderrk community, for they succeeded in publicly exposing and preventing the Board’s underhanded plans to close down Coranderrk. John Green was never reinstated as manager as they requested, but the despised Rev. Strickland was dismissed and living conditions improved. Finally in 1884, Chief Secretary Graham Berry ordered that Coranderrk should be permanently reserved as a ‘site for the use of Aborigines’. It was a short-lived victory, however. In 1886, the Victorian Government passed the infamous ‘Half-Cast’ Act, designed to push so-called ‘half-cast’ men and women off the reserves and facilitate their assimilation into the white population. The 1886 Act caused the breaking-up of families and separation of the younger, literate, generation from their Elders. As a direct result, Coranderrk was eventually closed in 1924.

Barak and the Coranderrk community’s fight for self determination should never be forgotten. Finally I am beginning to understand the sense of longing I feel when I stand on that high rolling hill in Healsville.

It’s a story every Victorian should know.

Many thanks to Jason and Karen Whitting for supplying the tickets and to Lisa Hill and Maureen Hanna for accompanying me. An excellent, thought provoking play, good company and plenty of strong coffee. What a great way to spend a Sunday in Melbourne